Great Books Marathoners Read About Marathon

The time has come for another Great Books Monday post. Unfortunately, preparing for an in-town move and work responsibilities have slowed me down this past week, and I need one more day to read Federalist #41 and to put Euclid to bed before I post my comments on last week’s readings.

Not to worry, though. I’ll go ahead and post the readings for this week so you intrepid adventurers can forge ahead:

  1. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, Chapter XVII* (GGB Vol. 2, pp. 105-113)
  2. The Histories of Herodotus, Book VII (GBWW Vol. 5, pp. 314-359)
  3. The Rocking-Horse Winner” by D.H. Lawrence (GGB Vol. 3, pp. 512-525)
  4. Federalist #42 (GBWW Vol. 40, pp. 136-139; Antifederalist responses are here)
  5. “On Time”by Loren Eiseley (GGB Vol. 8, pp. 123-129; essay from The Immense Journey)
  6. Lucretius” by George Santayana (GGB Vol. 10, pp. 365-390; Ch. 2 of Three Philosophical Poets)

Unfortunately, I could not find the text of the Eiseley essay online. The work from which it is taken was published in 1962 and is still covered by copyright. The best I can do is post a link to a cheap edition at Amazon.com.

Posting here has been light the couple of weeks due to our impending move and, in all likelihood, will continue to be so until mid-July.

*The GGB set contains only 117 pages of excerpts from Robinson Crusoe. I plan to read the whole novel, but if you wish to stick with Adler, read the following excerpts from the linked chapter: paragraphs 1-3 and paragraphs 11-23.

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About Dr. J

I am Professor of Humanities at Faulkner University, where I chair the Department of Humanities and direct online M.A. and Ph.D. programs based on the Great Books of Western Civilization. I am also Associate Editor of the Journal of Faith and the Academy and a member of the faculty at Liberty Classroom.
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